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Hideous barriers are mooted for the Surf Coast Highway. Government is spending BILLIONS making our countryside ugly. This latest nanny state behaviour would be funny if it wasn’t so pathetic.

Geelong Advertiser, Wednesday April 10

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Surf & Turf, Geelong Advertiser, February 9, 2019

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Surf & Turf, Geelong Advertiser, February 2, 2019

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I wrote this piece more than a year ago, just before the Australian Government shut the concentration camp on Manus Island. The UNHCR credited this piece with changing federal policy on the handling of the camp closure and led to a previously unplanned “transition period” for the 900 men there. Once this piece was splashed on the front of The Age and Sydney Morning Herald, with an accompanying editorial written by Sunday Editor Duska Sulicich, it featured on Insiders on the ABC and the issue was referenced by three politicians in parliament the following week.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/trash-left-in-limbo-fears-for-refugees-on-manus-after-detention-centre-closes-20170810-gxtjjd.html

That said, NOTHING has actually changed for those men on the island and they still live in limbo, still tortured by the Australian government.

I wrote this opinion piece about Darryn Lyons for The Age recently and it was an interesting exercise to say the least. Had some incredibly positive feedback but also plenty saying I was too cruel. Irrespective, it’s out in the public domain now and I thought I’d post it here for posterity.

Enoy!

Lyons on the loose

Thanks to Yes2Renewables for sharing this story about Surf Coast Shire’s environmental leadership. Big thanks to Kate Sullivan and the environment team for being champions – generally. All the time.

The Surf Coast Shire Council has urged the Andrews government to lift the level of ambition for the Victorian Renewable Energy Targets.

In its Renewable Energy Roadmap, the government committed to implement Victorian Renewable Energy Targets for 2020 and 2025–including the baseline target of at least 20 per cent renewable by 2020.

The Surf Coast Shire Council has joined Yes 2 Renewables in a call for a greater level of ambition.

“The Victorian Government’s target of 20 per cent by 2020, while positive, is below the current South Australian energy generation of 36 per cent from renewables and the ACT’s target, which aims for 90 per cent of energy generation from renewables by 2020,” said the council in an official statement.

Acting Mayor Cr Eve Fisher says there’s strong community support for renewable energy in the region.

zm2e5ed51havlzl6lciy_400x400 Acting Mayor, Eve Fisher (Surf Coast Shire Council).

“We represent an environmentally conscious community…

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Source: Welcome green shoots come from state govt renewable energy plans

I’ve just spent time in Portugal and Switzerland researching drug decriminalisation. I was lucky to tag along with Australian Greens Leader Senator Richard Di Natale on his quest to discover approaching to drug treatment abroad. I wrote this opinion piece for the Geelong Advertiser.

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This article was originally posted at Climate Progress. View the original article here

The government of Queensland, Australia is just beginning to implement a new energy policythat changes the way businesses are charged for electricity, a policy that the solar industry says is designed to make sure businesses have no reason to install commercial-scale rooftop solar panels.

According to a report in RenewEconomy, the policy reduces the price of actual energy consumption for businesses, but increases the price for energy service in general. That “service fee” has made it so businesses that were originally charged $42 dollars a day are now being charged $488 a day. With the area’s Goods and Services Tax, that amounts to a charge of $533 every day for electricity use. Prices on energy consumption have fallen to 10.4 cents per kilowatt hour from 11.6 center per kilowatt hour, the report said.

This…

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Shadow energy minister Lily D'Ambrosio (Labor) addresses the packed Portland Forum. Shadow energy minister Lily D’Ambrosio (Labor) addresses the packed Portland Forum.

Victoria has got what it takes to grow and maintain a thriving renewable energy jobs sector, but government policy roadblocks are standing in its way, a packed forum of locals heard in Portland on Sunday.

Former Australian Liberal party leader, Dr John Hewson, kicked off the Renewable Energy & Jobs Forum. Dr Hewson said governments need to do much more than we’re doing today to address climate change. “There are enormous opportunities from a sensible response to climate change,” Dr Hewson stated, referring to the jobs that can be created by the growing renewable energy sector.

John Hewson Former Australian Liberal leader, Dr John Hewson thinks a Victorian Renewable Energy Target is a good idea.

Speakers from Portland-based businesses that employ hundreds of locals told the packed audience that renewable energy is a key pillar of south west Victoria’s regional economy. 

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